Finding Florida Senior Living

Florida is by far the most popular place for Independent and Assisted-Care living, and because of this there are new communities being erected every year, causing a desire to be the best with the most amenities and best care offered. While this is great for all who are in the market for adult care, but it does post the issue of now which one do I pick, which one is best for mom and dad, who will take the best care of our loved one? Don’t let this decision consume you, let us at Assisted Living of Florida take this burden from you, make it our mission, and consult with all the different communities for you and help you make the proper decision.

If you are looking for assisted living services for your loved one, then we urge you to allow someone that has been through the whole process in Florida to help you. It is not an easy situation or process to deal with, and there is guilt and fear involved. We want you to know these emotions are normal.

We thought you should know that what you are thinking is bad, may not be all that bad. The situation of your loved one will determine what level of care they need, and more times than not they do not actually need to go to a nursing home as most think. A small percentage of seniors ever need to go to a skilled nursing facility, and are actually able to enjoy the luxuries and freedoms of a regular lifestyle with assistance.

You have someone here at Assisted Living Services of Florida LLC that has already been through the whole process, and has gone ahead of you and prepared the way for you and your family. We have put together everything you will need in order to take the steps of  change that lie ahead.

 

Florida

 

Florida was purchased from Spain by the United States in 1819, and was surrendered to the latter in July, 1821. Emigration then began to flow into the Territory, in spite of many obstacles. In 1835 warfare broke out between the fierce Seminole Indians, who inhabited some of the better portions of Florida, and the government of the United States, and continued until 1842, when the Indians were subdued, though not thoroughly conquered.

 

During the final quarter of the nineteenth century, large-scale commercial agriculture in Florida, especially cattle-raising, grew in importance. Industries such as cigar manufacturing took root in the immigrant communities of the state.

 

Potential investors became interested in the land and water and began to extract from the resources. These extractive operations were as diverse as sponge harvesting in Tarpon Springs and phosphate mining in the southwestern part of the state. The Florida citrus industry grew rapidly, and the development of industries throughout the state prompted the construction of roads and railroads.

 

Beginning in the 1870s, residents from northern states visited Florida as tourists to enjoy the state’s natural beauty and mild climate. Steamboat tours on Florida’s winding rivers were a popular attraction and still are today.

 

During this period, many of the railroads were constructed throughout the state by companies owned by Henry Flagler and Henry B. Plant, who also built lavish hotels near their railroad lines. The Internal Improvement Act stimulated the initial efforts to drain the southern portion of the state in order to convert it to farmland.

 

These development projects had increasing effects on the agricultural and manufacturing industries of late-nineteenth-century Florida. The citrus industry especially benefitted, since it was now possible to pick oranges in south Florida; put them on a train heading north; and eat them in New York in less than a week.

 

By the turn of the century, Florida’s population and the wealthy were increasing rapidly; the potential of the “Sunshine State” appeared endless, and land developers descended on this virtual gold mine. With more Americans owning automobiles, it became commonplace to vacation in Florida. Many visitors stayed on, and exotic projects sprang up in southern Florida. Some people moved onto land made from drained swamps. Others bought canal-crossed tracts through what had been dry land. The real estate developments quickly attracted buyers, and land in Florida was sold and resold.

 

Now in 2012, history repeats itself and will continue, the “Sunshine State” and all of its possibilities is endless. With all of the new construction always in effect and people of all ages moving here, there is no better place to come and stay. Our medical industry is one of the most notarized, and one of the largest facilities in medical research is now newly based in Jupiter, Florida, The Scripps Research Institute, a world leader in biomedical breakthroughs that lay the foundation for improvements in human health.